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Why Choose PC DOS 2000 over MS-DOS 6.22?

IBM PC DOS 2000 gives the DOS customer many enhancements in the areas of usability, memory optimization, full-function utilities, and new hardware support, bringing IBM PC DOS to the forefront of the single-tasking operating systems available today. This article compares and contrasts IBM's latest DOS offering, PC DOS 2000, with Microsoft's latest DOS offering, MS-DOS 6.22.

Disk Compression

PC DOS Version 2000 comes with Stacker 4.0, the industry-standard disk compression software created by Stac Electronics. This technology is integrated into PC DOS 2000 to give you the highest compression ratio and the most free disk space possible. Stacker has many features that distinguish it as the leading disk compression software product on the market.

Users of other compression products such as DoubleSpace, DriveSpace, SuperStor/DS, and earlier versions of Stacker can easily and seamlessly upgrade to Stacker 4.0. The version of Stacker bundled in PC DOS 2000 provides the convenience of having a complete DOS and Windows interface. Stacker also has the ability to dynamically calculate the current data compression ratio and will automatically reflect the changes to the user. Stacker 4.0, even with the enhanced functionality it provides, takes up less conventional memory than other disk compression products.

Providing a method for compressed diskette portability has also been solved by the current version of Stacker. With the compression provided by PC DOS 2000, you can compress a diskette, take that diskette to any other DOS machine, and be able to access the compressed data on that diskette even though the other machine may not have Stacker installed.

Password protection of drives has also been addressed in a unique manner. Stacker provides the ability to have both Read-Only and Read/Write passwords. This means that a specific compressed drive can be password-protected. You can then give someone else the Read-Only password to access data on the compressed drive, but not to change it. When the computer is turned on, the user is prompted to enter the Read-Only password, and the drive will be mounted in write-protected mode.

There are many features that distinguish PC DOS 2000's data compression offering from MS-DOS 6.22's. Figure 1 gives a brief synopsis of some of the differences.

Backup

Central Point's Backup utility (Figure 2) is included in PC DOS 2000. This backup utility provides a DOS and Windows interface for ease of use. Some features of the latest version of Central Point's Backup are:

  • Support for a wide variety of tape formats, including QIC and SCSI interfaces
  • Full support for backing up to a hard disk, high-speed diskette, and optical and removable disk drives
  • The ability to be scheduled well in advance for an unattended backup
  • The ability to compress data when backing up

Another feature that makes this product easy to use is the inclusion of file viewers, so that you can view many DOS and Windows files prior to backing them up. This enables you to view files such as bitmaps in their native form, so you will readily recognize if they are files that you want to back up or not.

Memory Management

Most DOS users want to maximize the amount of conventional memory available, so one of the objectives when developing PC DOS 2000 was to give the user as much memory as possible (Figure 4). This was accomplished by:

  1. Tuning the DOS Kernel, utilities, and device drivers to have a smaller memory footprint. Less efficient and more bulky programming routines were replaced by routines that were highly optimized for memory and/or speed. This was all done without losing any features or compatibility.
  2. Adding several new features that allow DOS users to move certain pieces of code into upper memory without requiring specialized software. An example is the DOSDATA=UMB command, which (when placed in CONFIG.SYS) moves the FILES, BUFFERS, LASTDRIVE, and STACKS into an upper memory block. This alone can realize a savings of 12 KB in conventional memory.

Most users will gain between 10 KB and 60 KB of memory using IBM PC DOS 2000 instead of MS-DOS 6.22, though actual results may vary based on the configuration. Figure 4 shows a gain of 32 KB, and additional savings are possible. For example, if the user uses IBM AntiVirus, the gain can be an additional 17 KB (as shown in Figure 3); and if the user uses compression, the gain can be an additional 19 KB (as shown in Figure 1). In total, the savings can amount to more than 60 KB.

Online Help

PC DOS 2000 includes a highly enhanced online help facility (Figure 5), which offers full-screen online help with pull-down menus and full mouse support. Contained within the help screens are hypertext links that connect to related topics and allow you to see a full description of related commands; when done, you go back to the original screen that you came from.

Part of the online help facility is an online publication viewer. This viewer uses a subset of the information presentation facility (IPF) format, and gives you the ability to view online books. Now you can quickly and easily access many online books that are provided with PC DOS or other sources. The viewer provides advanced functions such as hypertext links, search, and printing.

Text Editor

The E Editor (Figure 6) is a powerful, full-function tool for browsing or editing files. Many enhancements to the E Editor make it very powerful and easy to use.

The E Editor has full pull-down menu and mouse support. You have the ability to change the E editor's initialization file, which allows for customizing the way that many of the features of E work.

A browse mode is available for files that you want to view without taking the chance of changing. E also has REXX and C autosyntax support, which offers users of either the REXX or C programming language some relative convenience when typing common syntax. Also, working with text files that occupy 132 columns is no longer a problem, because E now has 132-column support.

Once you use the many features of the E editor, any other editor without these features will seem unsatisfactory. For example, two of the most commonly edited files in DOS are CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT. With this in mind, the PC DOS 2000 programmers made it as simple as typing E /C to load the CONFIG.SYS into the E Editor, and E /A to load the AUTOEXEC.BAT into E. And if you want to edit both files, simply typing E /C /A will serve that purpose! In addition, when you load two or more text files, you have full cut-and-paste capability between both files.

Data Recovery

PC DOS 2000 provides a full-function, full-screen Undelete program (Figure 7) that allows you to retrieve files that have been inadvertently deleted. For ease of use, both a DOS and a Windows interface are provided with Undelete.

Undelete has three levels of protection. The lowest level of protection is the Standard DOS protection. This gives you the ability to recover files that have not yet been overwritten.

The intermediate level of protection is Tracker. With Tracker protection activated, the clusters that a file occupies are made available. However, a record of the clusters that a file was occupying is made, and as long as the clusters have not been overwritten, there is a good chance of recovering the file.

The highest level of protection is called Sentry. When Sentry is activated, files that are protected by it are saved to a hidden directory, and can be recalled by the Sentry in perfect condition. If the free space on the hard disk is getting low, Sentry will begin to remove the oldest files that are in the hidden directory, so there will be space for other files. Note, however, that with the Sentry level of protection, a lot of disk storage may be used, because whenever a file is "deleted," a backup of that file is created elsewhere on the disk.

PCMCIA Support

Many people today purchase laptops that have PCMCIA card slots. With this in mind, PC DOS 2000 now provides PCMCIA support (Figure 8) from Phoenix Technologies. This support is PCMCIA 2.1-compliant.

There are several different types of PCMCIA cards -- fax/modem, network, hard-disk (ATA), flash memory, and static random-access memory (SRAM) cards, as well as many other types of peripherals made in a PCMCIA card format. Therefore, it is increasingly important to support these types of cards in a simple, easy-to-use interface. PC DOS 2000's PCMCIA support has an easy-to-use DOS and Windows interface.

Most cards are configured automatically by PC DOS 2000. By simply plugging the card into the socket, the plug-and-play support for PCMCIA automatically detects the insertion of the card, and readily identifies and configures it. On the small chance that the automatic detection does not recognize the card inserted, PC DOS 2000 has an easy-to-use program for configuring the card.

Advanced Power Management

Traditionally, only portable systems (laptops) required any type of power management to reduce the power usage of their batteries. Today, many systems have power management built into the BIOS. With the abundance of machines that now come with Advanced Power Management built in, there was a concern for having the most current support possible. PC DOS 2000 now supports the latest Advanced Power Management (APM) standard (version 1.1), as well as APM 1.0 (Figure 9).

File Transfer

PC DOS 2000 now provides a PC-to-PC File Update utility (Figure 10). This utility can synchronize files between two systems using diskettes, parallel/serial connections, or networking software.

This utility is customized so that it ignores specific types of non-data files. It can also be customized to synchronize between multiple environments. For instance, if a laptop machine has a C drive, and a desktop machine has a C and a D drive, the user can tell the File Update utility to synchronize the laptop C:\WP51 directory with the desktop D:\WP51 directory. The File Update utility also allows for flexibility in the directory correspondence. For instance, if the same laptop machine has a C:\WP51 directory and the desktop machine has a D:\WP511 directory, File Update can be configured so that it understands this correspondence.

File Update has an easy-to-use, full-screen interface as well as a command-line interface. File Update requires two computers, which are connected via a parallel, serial, or LAN connection. If it is not practical to connect two machines in this way, synchronizing via diskette is another method of transferring the data.

Additional Utilities

There are many other features in PC DOS 2000 that add substantial value (Figure 11).

PC DOS 2000 has a DEFRAG utility that defragments the files on your hard disk. This can increase the speed of loading files from the hard disk.

Docking support for DOS and Windows allows a user to dock a laptop into a docking station and automatically initiate a configuration for the docking station.

The REXX programming language, included with PC DOS 2000, allows you to access a powerful high-level language via a batch file. Along with the REXX interpreter itself, there is an on-line book providing a quick reference for REXX.

PC DOS 2000 also has a utility called DYNALOAD. This enables you to use the command line to load many of the device drivers that are normally loaded in CONFIG.SYS (such as a CD-ROM device driver or a RAM drive). For instance, to load a 1 MB RAM drive in extended memory from the C> prompt, you need only type:

DYNALOAD C:\DOS\RAMDRIVE.SYS /E 1024

DYNALOAD is convenient for people who may not want to load certain drivers due to memory constraints, but still want to have access to their drivers without having to reboot.

ACALC is a simple command-line calculator in PC DOS 2000 that can perform simple functions such as 5+5 and complex functions such as FACT(((8+1)/2*pi())*2-SQRT(MAX(6;3)))

PC DOS 2000: The Clear Choice

The many features, functions, and capabilities in PC DOS 2000 distinguish it as the Disk Operating System of choice for beginning, intermediate and power users.


FIGURES:

Figure 1. Disk Compression Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Compression Type
Stacker 4.0
DRVSPACE
Allow for upgrade of other compression products
Superstor/DS, DoubleSpace, DriveSpace, and earlier versions of Stacker
none
Maximum compressed drive size
2 gigabytes
512 megabytes
DOS/Windows interface
DOS and Windows Interface
Dos-only interface
Memory Footprint below 1 MB
As small as 17 KB
As small as 36 KB
Ability to tune compression for maximum speed or maximum compression
Included
Not included
Assign password protection to compressed drives
Included
Not included
Dynamically adjust the free space based on actual data compressibility
Included
Not included
Use compressed diskettes on other ODS PC's with or without compression
Included
Not included
Break the 2:1 compression barrier (based on average user data)
Included
Not included
Windows screen saver
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 2. Backup Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
DOS and Windows interface
Included
Included
Compress data while backing up
Included
Included
Backup to floppy diskettes using high-speed floppy access
Included
Not included
Wide variety of tape support
Included
Not included
Schedule backup for execution at a later time when the user is not present
Included
Not included
Support for viewing files from many DOS applications
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 3. Virus Protection Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Number of viruses that can be detected
> 2100
800
Memory footprint of anti-virus shield
< 6 KB
< 23 KB
DOS and Windows interface
Included
Included
Advanced fuzzy scanning technology for finding a variety of virus mutations
Included
Not included
Scan OS/2 Boot Manager's boot record for viruses
Included
Not included
Descriptive virus information database, which includes virus symptoms
Included
Not included
Schedule for the automatic scanning of viruses
Included
Not included
Positive verification before anti-virus program attempts to disinfect
Included
Not included
Alert messages can be tailored to tell users which action to perform
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 4. Memory Management Differences

 
PC DOS 2000 Conventional/Upper Memory in Bytes
MS DOS 6.22 Conventional/Upper Memory in Bytes
Memory Reduction in Bytes
Memory footprint of:
DOS Kernel
7920 / 0
8720 / 0
800
HIMEM.SYS
720 / 0
1120 / 0
400
EMM386.EXE
3392 / 0
4144 / 0
752

DOS Data Area Files=30, Buffers=10, Lastdrive=Z, Stacks=9,256)(*)

0 / 12112
12112 / 0
12112
COMMAND.COM
0 / 5568
5760 / 0
5760
ANSI.SYS
0 / 3600
0 / 4208
608
DISPLAY.SYS
0 / 4848
0 / 8304
3456
DOSKEY.COM
0 / 1152
0 / 4144
2992
SHARE.EXE
0 / 2704
0 / 6208
3504
RAMDRIVE.SYS
0 / 432
0 / 1296
864
SMARTDRV.EXE
0 / 28304
0 / 28848
544
NLSFUNC.EXE
0 / 2448
0 / 2784
336
SETVER.EXE
0 / 0 (**)
0 / 464
464
Total Conventional Memory Savings (in bytes): 32592
* Size of the DOS Data Area can vary by differing the configuration
** All of SETVER.EXE resides in a high memory area, above conventional and upper memory
(Return to Text)


Figure 5. Online Help Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Online reference for DOS commands, utilities, and syntax use
Included
Included
Full-screen online help with pull down menus and mouse support
Included
Included
Hypertext links connect related topics and show examples of use
Included
Included
Viewer can view other online books using the IPF standard
Included
Not included
Multi-pane viewer displays the table of contents along with the item
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 6. Text Editor Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Ability to navigate the editor with pull-down menus and/or mouse
Included
Included
Edit and view multiple files simultaneously
Included
Not included
Draw lines or boxes using the basic set of ASCII characters
Included
Not included
Sort, add, or multiply data within a marked area
Included
Not included
Extended functions (sorting, adding, paragraph re-flow, set margins, set tabs)
Included
Not included
Undo previously deleted text
Included
Not included
132-column support
Included
Not included
Browse mode
Included
Not included
Provides syntax expansion for the C and REXX programming languages
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 7. Data Recovery Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
File protection for Tracker and Sentry data recovery schemes
Included
Not included
Full-screen DOS user interface
Included
Not included
File viewers for many DOS applications
Included
Not included
Recovery of files that resided in deleted directories (from a DOS session)
Included
Not included
Advanced undelete method to recover data from destroyed files
Included
Not included
Recovery of files protected by Novell's NetWare/DelWatch protection schemes
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 8. PCMCIA Support Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
PCMCIA version/provider
Version 2.1/Phoenix Technologies
Not included
DOS and Windows interface
Included
Not included
Multi-configuration installation support
Included
Not included
Configurable .INI file to store PCMCIA card information
Included
Not included
Autoconfiguration of standard fax and modem cards
Included
Not included
Enhanced usability (easy to install or uninstall, and to configure)
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 9. Advanced Power Management Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
POWER.EXE driver to conserve energy for PCs with APM support
Included
Included
APM version 1.0 and 1.1 BIOS support
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)


Figure 10. File Transfer Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Transfer of files between two PCs using the parallel or serial port
Included
Included
Easy-to-use, full-screen DOS user interface with pull-down menu support
Included
Not included
File synchronization utility that keeps files on two PCs the same
Included
Not included
Return to Text)


Figure 11. Additional Utilities Differences

 
PC DOS 2000
MS DOS 6.22
Support for CD-ROM drive
Included
Included
Defrag program that reorganizes fragmented files into contiguous files
Included
Included
Quick BASIC programming language
Not included
Included
Scan Disk utility
Not included
Included
DOS/Windows docking support
Included
Not included
REXX programming language support
Included
Not included
Support for pen-based systems
Included
Not included
Scheduling events for unattended use
Included (SCHEDULER)
Not included
Loading selected device drivers from the command line
Included(DYNALOAD)
Not included
Command-line calculator
Included (ACALC)
Not included
DOS full-screen interface/task switcher
Included (DOSSHELL)
Available separately
Installation routine aware of environments using DOS's multi-configuration support
Included
Not included
Configuration Installation Distribution (CID)client
Available
Not available
Comprehensive written and online documentation
Included
Not included
Drive locking lets you lock diskettes, PCMCIA, and CD drives
Included
Not included
Browse files safely without being able to edit them
Included
Not included
(Return to Text)
...pisz do nas


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